Tuesday’s Daily Piece: Navigating Holiday Parties

When it comes to our health, nutrition is medicine so it is imperative that we consider the food and beverages that we consume. The holiday season is so challenging in navigating our food and beverage choices as much temptation exist to over indulge and make lots of unhealthy food choices. Below are some wonderful tips to help you navigate your way through holiday parties.

  1. Make physical activity a top priority the day of the party. Be intentional! Schedule an “appointment” for this vital physical activity.
  2. Avoid arriving at the party hungry.  We all know what happens if we are hungry at a party, we overindulge.  Eat a small meal or snack of protein and non-starchy vegetables before going to party.
  3. Check out all your food options before putting any food on your plate. Consider which foods are worth eating and which foods can be skipped – stick with your decision.
  4. If after the first bite, you realize that you do not enjoy the food item, leave it on your plate.  Remember, you do not have to be a member of the clean plate club.
  5. Select your non starchy veggies first (they will fill you up) (i.e., broccoli, baby carrots, tomatoes, celery, cucumbers, cauliflower). Keep the dip to very small spoonful.  Think of “touching” the food in the sauce vs “dipping”!
  6. Eat sweet treats, chips, crackers and cheese in moderation.  Avoid eating while fixing your plate rather take time to sit down and enjoy your food. 
  7. Keeping some distance between yourself and the food will prevent you from grazing. 
  8. Moderating alcohol is key (one drink for a woman and possibly two for men).  Sipping on a glass of water or mineral water is a great alternative. Often, simply having the glass of water in your hand will ward off the desire for additional alcohol or food.
  9. Focus your time at the party on catching up with friends and making new connections.
Image result for holiday parties
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#holiday #party #tips #navigating

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram.

Saturday’s Daily Piece: Expanded Age Indication for Toujeo

Insulin glargine (Toujeo) is now FDA approved for children ages 6 and older with type 1 and 2 diabetes. Previously, Toujeo was indicated for people ages 18 and older with type 1 and 2 diabetes. To learn more about the results EDITION JUNIOR trial, please click below.

https://www.biospace.com/article/fda-approves-sanofi-s-toujeo-for-pediatric-diabetes/

Image result for toujeo in pediatric
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#pediatrics #diabetes #Toujeo

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram.

Thursday’s Daily Piece: Campaign for Sustainable Rx Pricing

Have you heard of the Campaign for Sustainable Rx Pricing? If not, it is important to learn about this vital campaign. The price of prescription medications has risen at exponential rates over the last several years. This campaign addresses the unsustainable price for medications. To learn more, please click below.

https://www.csrxp.org/news-updates/

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#DrugPrices #diabetes #advocacy

Wednesday Daily Piece: Vaccination Update for Adults Aged 65 and Older

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) no longer recommends routine administration of pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) in adults aged 65 and older. Rather, adults aged 65 and older are advised to engage with their healthcare provider in shared clinical decision making regarding PCV-13.

https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/pneumo/hcp/PCV13-adults.html

Related image
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#PCV13 #ACIP #Immunizations

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram.

Thursday’s Daily Piece: Insulin Storage Misconception

Did you know that it is a misconception that insulin must always be in the refrigerator or on ice? The truth is prior to first use an insulin vial or pen should be kept in the refrigerator. However, once it is opened and used, it can be kept a room temperature. So if you are going out to eat with friends or family, simply slide your insulin pen into your pocket or purse. Don’t miss out on fun outings simply because of insulin.

Image result for insulin pens
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#insulin #storage #misconception

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram.

Tuesday’s Daily Piece: Tips for Navigating Thanksgiving Meal

Thanksgiving, annual day of giving thanks, is fast upon us. Many of us enjoy a meal with friends and family during Thanksgiving. Below are some practical tips to help you successfully navigate and enjoy this delicious meal.

If you are guest at a friend’s or family member’s home offer to bring a healthy dish with you so that you know you will be having at least one healthy option. 

If you are hosting the meal, clear the table after an adequate period of time and put away the food to avoid the temptation of guests grazing. 

If you are cooking, limit the sampling (or quality assurance, as I call it) of foods.

Make sure to have breakfast and snack earlier during the day to avoid any temptation to overindulge. 

Check out all of your food options first.  Consider how many servings of carbohydrates that you will select. One strategy is to take small spoonful’s of each food, or limiting your carbohydrates (i.e. potatoes, stuffing, dressing, rolls, desserts, rice) to two or three modest portions. Consider which carbohydrates that you truly want to eat.

Selecting fruits (in moderation) and non-starchy vegetables served raw, grilled or steamed are good options.  Limit the creams, butter, sauces and gravies.

Drink only low calorie beverages, water and unsweetened beverages. Limit alcohol to no more than one drink for women and potentially two drinks for men.

Allow yourself to have some of your favorite treats in moderation, eating them slowly and savoring each bite.

Image result for thanksgiving
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#Thanksgiving #meal #tips

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram.

November Blog: Tackling the Challenges of Traveling with Diabetes

Guest Contributor: Bethany Taylor

It’s that time of year again! With Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s right around the corner, many of us will be hitting the road, the airway’s, or maybe even a cruise to spend time with family and loved ones to celebrate all we have to be thankful for. Traveling within itself can be a challenge, but especially when traveling with diabetes.

A dear friend of mine with type 1 diabetes has had a few close calls when flying to some Thanksgiving destinations.  She and her husband were traveling to New York City.  She was prepared with her cool pouch for insulin vials, bag with insulin pump supplies and syringes (in case of a malfunction with the pump) and her glucose tabs.  She realized as soon as she got in the security line that she had forgotten her letter from her provider regarding her need to have insulin and insulin pump supplies due to having type 1 diabetes. She began to panic but her husband calmed her down. She explained her situation to the TSA agent who appreciated and understood her situation.  She remembered to avoid the “scanner” as it would fry her insulin pump. Disaster averted and fun time in New York City was had.

Image result for holiday travel

Here are a few tips to help traveling with diabetes go more smoothly.

First, here’s a few helpful tips with air travel:

  • Make sure to share with the TSA luggage inspector you are a person with diabetes.
  • Store your medications in your carry-on bag instead of putting them in your checked bag and carry a letter with you from your prescriber describing the need for your diabetes supplies as well as a list of medications you are on to prevent any issues with security. Storing medications in your carry on also avoids the potential of them getting lost if your checked luggage gets misplaced.
  • Liquid medications can be over 3.4 ounces (100 mL) in a carry-on bag, but you need to inform the TSA screener if any are more than 100 mL.
  • When traveling across time-zones, be sure to see your prescriber four to six weeks before you travel. When you travel east, the day is shorter so you may need less insulin or may need more insulin if you travel west. You also need to check your sugar more often. If you travel from north to south or vice versa, you likely won’t need to change how you take your insulin. With oral medications such as metformin, timing isn’t as critical, but you may need to skip the second dose of a twice-daily dosing when traveling east to avoid hypoglycemia.
  • When packing, be sure to include food and supplies to prevent and treat hypoglycemia.
  • Check feet daily for pressure sores.
  • The CDC recommends that patients check their blood glucose every 4 to 6 hours during air travel.
  • Persons with diabetes using insulin pumps may request a full body pat-down or visual inspection instead of going through a metal detector.
  • The recommended vaccines for diabetes patients to receive are influenza, pneumococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. This is something that should be addressed when visiting your doctor 4 to 6 weeks before travel.

If you are planning to do a road trip to your destination, a diabetes kit is essential. The kit should include a glucose monitor with extra batteries, a backup monitor for emergencies, plenty of lancets, and a pack of alcohol/cleaning wipes. The kit should be easily accessible but avoid putting it in the glove compartment so that it doesn’t get too hot/cold. If you take insulin, be sure to put it in a cooling pack.

Whether you’re traveling in the air or on the road, remember to visit your doctor ahead of time, prepare your supplies, and wear a diabetes medical alert bracelet in case of an emergency. Enjoy the holidays and safe travel!

Resources:

Center, Therapeutic Research. “Travel and Your Medicines.” Pharmacist’s Letter, July 2016, pharmacist.therapeuticresearch.com/Content/Segments/PRL/2016/Jul/Travel-and-Your-Medicines-9921.

“Travelers’ Health.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/travelers-with-additional-considerations/travelers-with-chronic-illnesses#table503.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#tackling #travel #diabetes

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram.

Saturday’s Daily Piece: Celebrating National Diabetes Month

Beyond Type 1 Diabetes has a special campaign during this November, National Diabetes Month. Making an invisible disease visible (#THEDROPSPOTTED). If you have Type diabetes, or a friend or family member of Type 1 diabetes, please learn more about Beyond Type 1.


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#BeyondType1 #THEDROPSPOTTED

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram ReecesPiecesDI.

Thursday’s Daily Piece: Walgreens New Option CGM Access

Because CGM is billed through Medicare Part B, historically, there have been limited pharmacies providing CGM access. Walgreens has discovered the secret sauce for billing for Dexcom’s G6 CGM so now folks can have their prescription for G6 CGM filled at their local Walgreens pharmacy. Walgreens is currently working other CGM manufacturers to have ability to fill prescription for those CGMs. Always great to have options.

https://drugstorenews.com/walgreens-debuts-medicare-billing-solution-enable-cgm-access

Dexcom G6 Transmitter
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#Dexcom #G6 #Walgreens #Access

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram ReecesPiecesDI.

October Blog: Coming to a Pharmacy Near You – A New Severe Hypoglycemia Treatment

Guest Contributors: Lashonta Luvene, Victoria Oshunkentan

Recently, FDA approved Gvoke HypoPenÔ, a ‘ready to use’ glucagon injection pen for the treatment of dangerously low blood sugar. Sounds interesting, so let’s jump in and gain some awareness on this new cutting edge drug! Who makes this drug? Gvoke HypoPen™ is manufactured by Xeris Pharmaceuticals. It is a pre-filled syringe that contains a room temperature, liquid-stable form of glucagon. The drug is auto-injected when pressed against the body, very similar to how an EpiPen works to treat severe allergic reactions. This medication can be used in individuals > age of 2 with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

What exactly does glucagon do in our body? The glucagon works to quickly increase the blood sugar by signaling the liver to release its stored sugar into your bloodstream. For years, the challenge has been the glucagon emergency kit requirement of mixing powder and liquid. Imagine how difficult it would be to mix with increased adrenaline pumping in your body as you see a loved one or a friend lying on the ground with low blood sugar. With Gvoke HypoPen™, the intimidation of mixing drugs and making potential mistakes is gone!

Image result for glucagon

Things to know:

  • Available in two doses: (1) 0.5 mg/0.1 mL single-dose for pediatric patients (2) 1 mg/0.2 mL single-dose for adolescents and adults
  • Dosage forms: Gvoke HypoPenÔ (auto injector) and GvokeÔ pre-filled syringe (PFS)
  • Retail cost: $280.80 cash price per syringe
  • Administered by subcutaneous injection into lower abdomen, outer thigh, or outer upper arm

Here are just a few reasons Gvoke is so great:

  • Ready-to-use auto injector
  • Easy to manage
  • No refrigeration required
  • Can be stored at room temperature
  • Has shelf life of two years
  • Available in 2 doses for adults and kids
  • Comes in either a single pack or in a convenient 2-pack
  • Packaging allows you to keep one on hand and the other at home, school, or work.

The Gvoke HypoPen™ will be released at some point in 2020 while Gvoke™ PFS is available now. If interested in this medication, speak to your healthcare provider. Insurance coverage has not yet been announced. However, Xeris Pharmaceuticals plans to launch a co-pay assistance program to enable out-of-pocket costs ranging from roughly $0-$40 for a pack of two.

https://investors.xerispharma.com/news-releases/news-release-details/xeris-pharmaceuticals-receives-us-fda-approval-gvoketm-glucagon

https://www.xerispharma.com/about/products

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-6.jpeg

Please share your thoughts and subscribe to receive my blogs.

#Xeris #Gvoke #hypoglycemia

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook @ReecesPiecesDi and Instagram ReecesPiecesDI.